In a World of Pure Imagination

imagination

A skill and trait that is being phased out and trampled to death by technology is our imagination. While technology is both a blessed and a curse, it hinders our ability to be original and open minded.

This episode discusses the trait of imagination and what things we can do on a daily basis to ensure we keep it beyond our childhood.

QUESTION(S) OF THE DAY: When was the last time you day dreamed and completely lost track of time? What did you daydream about? Please let me know in the comments.

Scroll below for links and show notes…

Selected Links from the Episode

Show Notes

  • The story of Jesse Liebman playing basketball at his grandparents house [02:00]
  • The cardboard box from the Dell computer and leveraging it as a space ship [08:32]
  • Socially, we are stunting our creativity [09:29]
  • Technology is a blessing, but is also destroying our originality [09:50]
  • Favorite movies of all-time Blazing Saddles and Willy Wonka and the Chocolate Factory with Gene Wilder [10:25]
  • Pure Imagination [11:58]
  • Imagination = Creativity = Originality = Open Mindedness [13:40]
  • Left brain vs. Right Brain [14:15]
  • Some people are more intrinsically creative than others [15:00]
  • People that are bigger risk takers are typically more creative than someone that doesn’t [15:16]
  • Eliminating the fear of failure [16:24]
  • Blocking out all other critiques and input [17:20]
  • The freeness of not being held back and the liberation that comes with that for your creativity [17:52]
  • Outside inputs and perspectives on imagination and creativity [18:48]
  • We could all be better at improving our imagination [19:43]
  • Don’t be a god damn sheep [20:09]
  • Spend some time in thought [20:39]
  • Jim Valvano and his infamous quote and speech about doing three things each and every day [20:51]
  • We should all spend time daydreaming and and time in thought [22:56]
  • Lose track of time in thought every day [24:07]
  • We need to dream and dream big [25:47]
  • Confide in someone you trust your dreams [26:27]
  • We should have both individuals that give us truth serum and someone that’s your biggest fan and 100% supportive [26:44]
  • You need to experience or do something creative at least once a week that is separate from your daily time in thought [28:05]
  • You need to experience or do something creative at least once a week that is separate from your daily time in thought [28:05]

People Mentioned

3 responses to “In a World of Pure Imagination”

  1. Lindsey Sweet says:

    This is my favourite episode because my job is to encourage students to be creative problem solvers in my art classes. Perhaps it is the community that I serve but so many students ask me, “What should I do,” when they don’t know how to proceed with their artistic process. They’re so afraid of getting a “bad” grade that they’ve completely lost sight of their ability to imagine other potential outcomes for their artwork. Sometimes I even get the sense that students are afraid to think outside of the box.

    When I was in graduate school for my masters in education, my cohort discussed at length the school system in Finland. Finland is special because the country believes its number one resource to be the human brain; their biggest industry is research and development. Using your imagination is basically a job in Finland, and these values are directly connected to the kind of education that is available to their population.
    (Check out the documentary here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=70AlyhEGWf4)

    With the state of education in the United States, we’re not showing students that their imagination is valued. Funding for education is tied to standardized testing, so we teach students how to test instead of how to be critical thinkers. We say all the time how important it is to be a creative problem solver, but that is not necessarily reflected in our economy or society. If we want to encourage people to use their imaginations we have to show them that the risks they take are appreciated.

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